Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy)

Clinical myotherapy is a system of health care focusing on assessment, treatment and management of musculoskeletal pain. Musculoskeletal pain can be divided into three categories: myofascial pain arising from trauma or muscle contracture; neuropathic pain deriving from the nervous system; and articular pain that originates from the joints.

Key Information

 

WHERE CAN I STUDY?

  • Melbourne
  • Melbourne

INTAKE DATES

  • 15 February 2021

View more dates here

WORKLOAD

Full-time on campus (min. 3 full days per week)

OR

Full-time blended (min. 1 full day per week on campus, plus online study)

COURSE DURATION

Full time 3 years
Part time 6 years

Full time 3 years
Part time 6 years

Studying at Think education

 

At THINK Education, we place equal value on theory and practice. We will ensure you are trained in the real-world skills you need for success.

A Global Network

Being a student at Think Education means you will be part of a leading international network home to over 19,000 students from 115 different countries.

Here for Good

We believe our students and graduates are improving lives and making the world a better place. Our universities provide the critical skills, knowledge and support to make this happen. This belief is expressed through our philosophy of being 'Here for Good'.

Course overview

 

WHAT TO EXPECT

Clinical Myotherapists can treat various issues such as sporting and occupational injuries, stiffness and sore body, chronic overuse syndromes, symptoms associated with arthritis, back pain, neck pain, stress and tension, pregnancy and more.

This three-year degree is approved by TEQSA (Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency) the National Australian accreditation body. Students will gain theoretical knowledge in the biomedical and clinical sciences combined with a proficiency in clinical reasoning and the dexterity to utilise specific manual skills.

Our Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy) degree is:

  • The longest established degree course of its type in Australia (AQF level 7)
  • Nationally recognised
  • Government accredited (FEE-HELP approved)

Our Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy) degree meets the requirements for graduates to join the following organisations:

  • MA (Myotherapy Association Australia)
  • MMA (Massage and Myotherapy Australia)

Students will learn how to ease muscle contracture and treat musculoskeletal pain caused by trauma, ageing and overload of muscles.

Students will gain hands on experience at The Practice Wellbeing Clinic under the guidance of experienced practitioners in a clinical setting treating public patients. This prepares graduates to confidently and successfully commence practice in the community.

Career Prospects: Complementary clinics, Medical clinics, Sporting clubs and Industries that require the treatment of pain management and musculoskeletal treatment.

Find out more about our Diploma and Advanced Diploma Upgrade program here

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Learn hands-on treatment methods, including massage, dry needling and joint mobilisatiosn
  • Study the biological and social sciences underpinning the discipline
  • Understand the complexities of how the human body moves
  • Extensive on-site and industry-based clinical experience
  • Master the art of improving physical function and wellbeing

What you’ll study

 

SUBJECTS

This course has 34 core units and 2 elective units across 5 trimesters, as outlined below.

CORE SUBJECTS

Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2 builds upon the foundational knowledge of the formation and spatial relationships of the tissues and joints of the lower body which is gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A) & Anatomy & Physiology 2 (BHS104A). This subject comprises the study of the pelvis, hip and lower limb. A practical component of this subject is essential and will incorporate study in the structure and function labs, so that students can examine tissues and regions of the human body in closer actuality. Dynamic anatomic and cadaveric software and models will also be part of the practical component.

Clinical Assessment will draw on their knowledge of upper body anatomy from musculoskeletal anatomy of upper limb, head, neck and thorax, and learn the theory and practical skills required in order to perform a comprehensive upper body musculoskeletal and neurological assessment. These skills will give the student the underpinning clinical reasoning of a practicing Clinical Myotherapist. In a supervised clinical environment, students will practice assessment skills on their fellow students, with ongoing feedback provided in order to fine tune assessment techniques and practice. Students will be introduced to patient record keeping through documenting assessments and outcomes through keeping a clinical logbook.

Surface Anatomy and Trigger Point Location 1 is a practical based class in which students will further develop their surface anatomy and trigger point referral pattern knowledge in relation to the upper limb, thorax, neck and head. Students will also develop their palpation skills through practical components. Students will locate and explore bony landmarks, tendons, muscles, ligaments, pulses and other soft tissue structures and areas of the upper body. Using palpation techniques in a supervised and feedback orientated learning environment students will learn to identify specific muscles, their trigger points and referred pain patterns.

In this practical based subject, students will learn the fundamentals of soft tissue mobilisation techniques used to treat neuromusculoskeletal disorders. In a supervised clinical classroom environment the student will learn palpatory assessment techniques, massage, myofascial release (MFR), cupping, neuromuscular techniques and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. Neuromuscular Techniques is an experiential learning based class and the student will practice and experience mobilisation techniques with their classmates by being both a patient and a practitioner to gain a full understanding of the soft tissue mobilisation methods, their uses and what they feel like. The student will also gain clinical experience in a supervised external placement according to their specific areas of interest.

Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1 builds upon the foundational knowledge of the formation and spatial relationships of the tissues and joints of the upper body that is gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A). This subject introduces students to the musculoskeletal components of the human body in a theoretical and practical setting, and comprises the study of the axial and appendicular skeleton (upper limb), nervous system, cervical and thoracic spine, head, and shoulder. A practical component of this subject is essential and will incorporate study in the structure and function labs, so that students can examine tissues and regions of the human body in closer actuality. Dynamic anatomic and cadaveric software and models will also be part of the practical component.

Myotherapy history and foundations teaches the fundamentals of Clinical Myotherapy practice. As a practical skills based class, students will develop skills in soft tissue massage, palpation, draping, patient positioning and patient management. Students will develop awareness of WH&S obligations and the historical origins of Clinical Myotherapy in Australia and its relationship to other manual medicine modalities.

Evidence-based practice is an essential component of the exercise of clinical judgement in the delivery of quality healthcare. Students will also gain an understanding of how research evidence is translated into practice. This subject provides students with an introduction to health informatics, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and evidence-based practice. Students are guided through the skills necessary to locate critique and interpret a research article for application to their practice. They will become familiar with quantitative and qualitative evidence, research methodology, basic descriptive and inferential statistics and the foundational skills to be able to evaluate and appraise evidence in healthcare research.

Human Biochemistry explains the processes of macromolecule metabolism, energy production and storage in the body. Included in this subject are the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids; the role of ATP and acetyl CoA in metabolism; oxidative phosphorylation, the electron transport chain, biosignaling and chemical communication. The concept of gene expression and regulation is also explored. Human Biochemistry provides healthcare practitioners a vital foundation on the basic macromolecules and genetic understandings essential for life. This knowledge will be built upon and expanded further in later subjects.

Human Structure & Physiology 2 will further develop knowledge of the structure and physiology of the human body with special attention given to the integration of human systems and beginning to explore the impact of disturbances in Homeostasis and disruption of normal function. The structure and function of the lymphatic, immune, digestive, nervous, endocrine, urinary, reproductive systems and the special senses are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body. This subject builds on the knowledge and understandings of human structure and physiology, provides the foundation to look at disease, disorders and syndromes and their pathophysiology, in later subjects.

Counselling & Communication Skills encompasses counselling skills commonly needed by health professionals for effective communication. This subject comprises a practical approach to a variety of communication skills and best practice strategies including promoting change, compliance, obstacles to change, transition and self-care. Sessions facilitate the development of effective listening and responding skills, increased personal awareness and insight in order to assist the building of a professional relationship for interactions with clients, colleagues and members of the community.

Biological Foundations explores the biological building blocks, which make up the human body from the chemical level up to the cellular level. These essential chemistry concepts will assist with building relevant links to the study of human physiology in later subjects. The subject then explores the foundational studies in biochemistry, which includes the structure and function of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, lipids, DNA and RNA. The concepts of gene expression and regulation are discussed in addition to the cellular membrane structure and transport through the membrane. The study of the biology of the human cell concludes this subject and upon completion equips students to commence study at the tissue level of structure and physiology subjects.

Human Structure & Physiology 1 introduces the basic concepts and terminologies required to study and understand the structure and function of the human body. This subject will build on the biological foundations by exploring the interaction and organisation of cells, tissues and organs, which forms a basis to study the physiological integration of key body systems. The maintenance and regulation of the internal environment by homeostasis at a system level will be key to students understanding disruption and disease in later subjects. Key physiological and functional processes such as movement, metabolism, oxygenation and protection will be discussed, with body systems including the integumentary, musculoskeletal, respiratory and cardiovascular system the focus of this subject. This subject will provide the first part of an evidence based foundational knowledge of human physiology to guide health practice.

 

CORE SUBJECTS

Musculoskeletal Pathology encompasses the common pathological conditions that a Clinical Myotherapist will see in practice and builds upon the core pathological concepts provided in General Pathology (BHS201A). This subject address the morphology, aetiology and underlying general principles operating in disease states in the neurological, musculoskeletal and integumentary systems, in addition to select disease states in the endocrine and pulmonary systems. An introduction to the currently used laboratory diagnostic methods that would inform diagnosis of conditions in a general practise is also included in this subject.
This subject is a key component in the education of a Clinical Myotherapist, as it provides knowledge of the various disease states that will be seen in practice, and correlates these disease states at a cellular and gross anatomical level with clinical signs and symptoms.

In Clinical Assessment 2 (CMY203A) the student will draw on their knowledge of lower body anatomy from Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2 (CMY106A). The student will learn the theory and practical skills required to order perform a comprehensive lower body musculoskeletal and neurological assessment. These skills will give the student the underpinning clinical reasonings of a practicing clinical Myotherapist. In a supervised clinical environment, students will practice their assessment skills on each other, with ongoing feedback provided in order to fine tune assessment technique and practice.

Clinical Assessment 3 provides the student with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to perform a comprehensive musculoskeletal and neurological assessment of the spine, sacro-iliac joint and TMJ. Emphasis will be placed on students being able to critically analyse assessment methods based on current literature and research. Students work in pairs practicing assessment skills on each other under close supervision.

Pain Management 2 (CMY211A) builds on the concepts learned in Pain management 1 (CMY207A) and gives the students comprehensive information about the assessment, treatment, diagnosis and evidence based management of pain and movement disorders affecting the lower body. At the completion of Pain Management 2, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of clinical signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, and evidence based decision making regarding management interventions used in clinical myotherapy practice.

Myofascial Dry Needling 2 provides the student with further knowledge on myofascial trigger points and their associated pain patterns and further develops skills in dry-needling techniques. The focus is on muscles of the torso and lower body. Clinical Health Management provides the student with the ability to put together a Clinical Myotherapy treatment from history taking to assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management, and provides a platform for their future Clinical Practicum subjects. Due to the practical nature of this class, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

Exercise Prescription 1 is a practice and theory based class which provides an introduction to the foundations and principals of exercise prescription. The student will learn to safely and effectively prescribe exercise as a therapeutic approach to patient management in a supervised and feedback rich learning environment. Looking at a range of patient presentations students will explore suitable and appropriate exercises, their application and therapeutic technique.

Pain Management 1 introduces concepts of pain and gives the students comprehensive information about assessment, diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions of the upper body within a biopsychosocial framework. This subject introduces outcome measures for pain assessment and builds upon the foundational knowledge acquired in subjects such as Anatomy & Physiology, Clinical Assessment and Neuroscience. Students develop an understanding of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions affecting the upper body. This includes aetiology, incidence clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial management strategies.

In this practical and theory based class the student will build on their myofascial trigger point and associated pain pattern knowledge of the upper body and limbs. Dry needling techniques will be developed in order to treat the noxious activity of trigger points using infection control principals in accordance with Australian safety standards and ethical considerations for specific pathologies. A practical skillset will also be developed, and the dexterity in the tactile detection and anatomical identification of individual myofascial trigger points will be enhanced, as will the ethical understandings of patient care and safety.

Biomechanics and Kinesiology will introduce the core concepts of motion analysis - a key underpinning of exercise prescription. The student will learn joint movement, forces involved in movement and positioning, and instrumentation for motion analysis. On completion, the student will have skills in place to analyse movement and discuss the forces involved.

Surface Anatomy and Trigger Point Location 2 is a practical based class in which students will further develop their surface anatomy and trigger point referral pattern knowledge in relation to the lower limb, thorax, pelvis and abdomen. Students will also develop their palpation skills through practical components. Students will locate and explore bony landmarks, tendons, muscles, ligaments, pulses and other soft tissue structures and areas of the lower body. Using palpation techniques in a supervised and feedback orientated learning environment students will learn to identify specific muscles, their trigger points and referred pain patterns.

This subject explores the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, risk factors and investigations required to diagnose a variety of common disease states. Disease states which affect the lifespan will be explored, with an emphasis disorders affecting adults and aged persons, focusing on the cellular changes that underlie human age related disease.
This subject will further develop student’s knowledge on risk factors for disease including genetics, environment, lifestyle, nutrition and sociocultural risk factors. The disruption of homeostasis and mechanisms of disease such as inflammation, infection, trauma and growth abnormalities will be explored. Basic principles of microbiology will be important for infection control practices.
The biomedical and biopsychosocial models of health will be explored, to identify theories behind disease development, management and treatment. Epidemiology will be explored to consider the environmental factors, which influence disease occurrence.
General investigative and diagnostic approaches will be introduced and discussed, the commonly used laboratory tests and interpretation of their findings for the diseases and conditions covered will be developed.
Disorders related to the ageing process and degeneration will be considered, to explore the common physiological changes associated to ageing and their impact on development of disease.
This subject builds on the theoretical knowledge from the structure and function of the human body, and provides the foundation to look at human disease pathophysiology, clinical presentation, common aetiologies and treatment, from a person centered approach.

Neuroscience & Motor Control introduces students to International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) terminology and aids the student in conceptualising the neurophysiology of pain. The IASP are a worldwide professional association dedicated to research, diagnosis and treatment of pain and, as such, set the standard for pain management guidelines. This subject provides students with a deeper understanding of human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and its relation to pain both from a peripheral and central nervous system perspective.

CORE SUBJECTS

Clinical practicum 3 is the final student clinic and builds on the clinical practice of practicum 1 & 2. Supervised by an experienced clinician students will draw on aspects of their theoretical and practical studies to assess, diagnose, manage and refer patients within the student clinic environment. Formulating and implementing evidence based treatment and pain management strategies and critically reflecting on clinical effectiveness is a key learning outcome.

Neuropsychology explores the psychological aspects of pain and the psychological considerations linked to pain management. Students will develop their understanding and explore the environmental dimensions and biopsychological aspects of pain, and the relationship to psychological issues. Health behaviour models, mental health issues and the role of social and occupational factors in pain management will also be key elements of learning.

Critical Literature Review (CLR308) provides an opportunity to critically examine the current literature to answer a chosen research question to inform clinical decision-making. The literature review is a scholarly paper that appraises the current knowledge base highlighting strengths, weaknesses and omissions in the literature. The subject builds on established knowledge of literature search methods and critical appraisal skills to culminate in a review that conforms to publication standards.

Clinical Practicum 2, builds on experience gained in Clinical Practicum 1 integrating new information to further develop clinical reasoning and evidenced based treatment approaches. Under the close supervision and monitoring of an experienced practitioner students will consult and treat patient’s injuries or conditions. Student clinic is the integration of practical and theoretical learning so far and provides an opportunity to formulate and implement evidenced based and relevant treatment plans. Ethical and medico‐legal responsibilities inherent in the practitioner‐patient relationship are a core aspect of clinical practice.

Pain Management 3 (CMY306A) explores the field of chronic pain in relation to biopsychosocial mechanisms within a multidisciplinary framework. This subject builds on knowledge gained from Neuroscience, Pain Management 2 and Musculoskeletal Pathology in order to understand and appreciate the many dimensions of pain in complex chronic pain conditions. This subject explores evidence based treatment and management strategies and their role in chronic pain management.

This subject expands and builds on the herbal disciplinary knowledge presented in Pharmacology 1 (CMP208) and 2 (CMP301). This subject aims to introduce theory of developing formulae and examines in detail the composition, actions and main therapeutic applications of approximately 120 major formulae. The depth of study may vary depending on the importance of the formulae and their frequency of use. Emphasis is upon the principles of composition, principle of modification, methods of preparation, administration of the herbs, actions, main therapeutic applications and any cautions or contraindications of traditional Chinese herbal formulae. Also included is an in-depth study of the comparisons and contrasts relating to formulae within a similar therapeutic category and the function of herbs both singularly and as a synergistic component within the formula.

Myotherapy clinical practicum 1 is an introduction to working in a clinical setting at our on campus student clinic. Under the close supervision and monitoring of an experienced practitioner students will consult and treat patient’s injuries or conditions. Student clinic is the integration of practical and theoretical learning so far and provides an opportunity to formulate and implement evidenced based and relevant treatment plans. Ethical and medico-legal responsibilities inherent in the practitioner-patient relationship are a core aspect of clinical practice.

Joint Mobilisation brings together the theory and practical approaches to assessment and treatment. This passive movement technique is applied to a spinal or peripheral joint in which an oscillatory movement is performed within the control of the patient. This subject draws on the ‘concept’ of treatment as developed by G. Maitland in which factors such as clinical reasoning, examination and evaluation are applied to the role of mobilisation in the management of musculoskeletal disorders.
Integrated Pharmacology comprises a study of basic principles of pharmacology, the pharmacokinetics of drugs commonly used in medical practice and common interactions between drugs, physical therapies and natural remedies. Drugs for pain, inflammation, infection, mental health, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems are discussed. Drug actions, uses, contraindications, adverse effects and interactions with natural remedies and physical therapies are discussed, together with implications for naturopathic, nutritional and herbal medicine prescribing. This subject is crucial for the modern healthcare practitioner to understand common medications that patients may be taking and common interactions between these medications and complementary treatments. This subject also emphasises the need for clear lines of communication and common language between doctors and complementary healthcare practitioners in order to obtain the best health outcomes for clients.
Entrepreneurship, Professionalism & Business Skills in Health will introduce students to the concepts of small business management, entrepreneurship and how to identify the professional requirements of their healthcare discipline. This subject will explore the topics necessary to establish and run a successful healthcare practice and maintain their professional status in the healthcare sector. Students will also explore their professional identity to support the understanding of the ethical conduct, liability, legal and regulatory requirements that are pertinent to their specific modality.
This subject will initiate the development of a Business plan using entrepreneurial practices and innovative design thinking. This will include exploring business strategies such as operating policy and procedures, marketing and branding, networking strategies, leadership, administration and financial issues necessary for the operation and management of a contemporary healthcare practice.

Sports Injury Management builds upon the clinical skills of assessment and treatment, with specific application to the athletic populations. This subject provides students with the underpinning theory and a range of practical skills to work in the sporting environment and support the prevention and management of common sporting injuries.
Professionalism, ethics and responsibilities are addressed, along with emergency action planning and on-field trauma management skills. Students will learn to apply evidence based and clinically reasoned decisions in sport specific return-to-play scenarios, and gain the practical skills to support return to play including taping and pre-game athlete support.
Students will be expected to complete clinical placement hours with a sporting club either previously or concurrently with this elective to support learning. Assistance to find placements will be provided.

Lifespan Myotherapy provides students with the knowledge of how to treat musculoskeletal pain that is relevant to paediatric and geriatric patients as well as in-depth knowledge on contraindications/precautions and acceptable treatments for pre and post-natal patients. This subject also provides students with knowledge about the impact of illness/injury/pain on quality of life. It incorporates theory on the history and efficacy of CAM and traditional remedies. Information relating to disease-specific population groups, as well as indigenous health issues and cultural implications for treatment will be incorporated.

This subject provides students with fundamental nutrition knowledge through examining the relationship between food, nutrition and human health. Students will learn about macro and micro-nutrition, dietary guidelines, role of nutrition in metabolism, health maintenance and disease, nutrient rich food sources, and the specific nutritional requirements throughout the lifespan. Students will also learn how to identify and construct a healthy diet according to specific dietary guidelines, and know the impact of nutritional deficiency and excess as they relate to health and disease.

The occupational environment plays an important role in combating or promoting the rise of chronic disease and disability. This environment has the capacity to affect the physical, psychological, economic and social well-being of workers’ and thus, proper attention to workers’ health offers vast opportunities for workers and employers alike. In this subject students will explore evidence linking worker health and wellbeing to organizational health and business performance. Specific analysis for business needs will be considered, with practical interventions designed to educate and enhance the occupational environment.

The problem of falls is a significant global issue and can result in injury, hospitalisation, loss of independence, social isolation, depression, poor health status, institutionalism and death. The World Health Organisation identify falls as occurring as a result of complex interrelationships between biological, behavioural, environmental and socioeconomic risk factors. With the predicted costs of falls expected to increase exponentially as our population ages there is a need for effective preventive strategies such as active ageing programs. This subject examines these complexities of ageing, where students will learn to assess falls risk and develop effective prevention strategies that promote wellbeing in ageing populations.

Social Enterprise is an exciting theoretically-based subject that is driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. These activities harness design thinking and problem-solving processes in the realisation of pragmatic, viable project proposals from initiation to client presentation.
By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities through systematic research and competitor analysis, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop and propose new ventures and products that focus primarily upon social change for good. In addition, this subject will help students understand and address the practical challenges of working within this environment; to analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, to explore diverse funding strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy. Social Enterprise enables students to appreciate the power of creativity in problem-solving and the importance of the designer’s role in making a difference and precipitating change.

CORE SUBJECTS

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to administer and monitor medications and intravenous (IV) therapy including calculating dosage requirements, interpreting written instructions from an authorised prescriber, assessing the person for medication effectiveness and side effects, and responding to an allergic pharmacological reaction.
This unit applies to enrolled nursing work carried out in consultation and collaboration with registered nurses and under supervisory arrangements aligned to the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia regulatory authority legislative requirements.
The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to evaluate and enhance own practice through a process of reflection and ongoing professional development.
This unit applies to workers in all industry sectors who take pro-active responsibility for their own professional development.
The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CORE SUBJECTS

This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to provide clinical nursing skills for a person with complex needs and to contribute to complex nursing interventions using critical thinking and problem-solving.
This unit applies to enrolled nursing work carried out in consultation and collaboration with registered nurses, and under supervisory arrangements aligned to the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia regulatory authority legislative requirements.
The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to contribute to the care of the person with an acute health problem by performing clinical nursing skills and interventions that support the person’s health care needs and assist them to regain optimal function and lifestyle.
This unit applies to enrolled nursing work carried out in consultation and collaboration with registered nurses, and under supervisory arrangements aligned to the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia regulatory authority legislative requirements.

HOW YOU'LL STUDY

 

Designed to fit in with you

With all your learning materials online, you can tailor a schedule to fit your personal needs.

Learn from specialists in their field

Our academics understand where the industry is heading and will guide you on your learning journey.

Reach career goals faster

Through hands-on learning, you’ll solve practical challenges that require problem-solving and genuine industry insight.

OUR CAMPUSES

 

Melbourne
Level 1, 196 Flinders Street,
Melbourne
1300 882 268

Fitzroy
25 Victoria Street,
Fitzroy, VIC 3065
1300 575 803

How much

 

Find out more about course fees and financial support – and for personalised advice, just ask.

View tuition fees and Fee-Help for domestic students.

View the international fee schedule and additional charges for international students.

 

Course tuition fees are available by contacting a Course and Career Advisor. If you are an eligible domestic student you may choose to defer some, or all, of your tuition fees through FEE-HELP. And as we are a university you can also take advantage of no loan fees on FEE-HELP when you study selected courses with us.

Your course fees are broken down into fees per trimester.

HOW CAN I PAY

 

Payment Methods

Upfront payment

via Flywire, Credit Card, BPAY, cheque or overseas bank account transfer.

Apply for a payment plan

with VET Student Loan and Payment plan

Payment Plan

You can also apply for a payment plan if you are a domestic student

Do I meet the entry Requirements?

 

Before we get started with your course application, check you meet all the requirements listed below.

General Entry Requirements

  • Year 12 or equivalent

Additional course entry requirement

  • First Aid Certificate, Working with Children and Police Check before commencing clinical subjects
  • Pass in a science subject at senior secondary level recommended
  • Pass in standard English Band 4 or above

Special Entry Requirements:

  • Demonstrated ability to undertake study at the required level:
    • broadly relevant work experience (documented e.g. CV), demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR
    • formal, informal or non-formal study, completed or partially completed, demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR
    • written submission to demonstrate reasonable prospect of success

View full course admission information

English Language Requirements

Approved English tests include:

  • Equivalent IELTS 6.5 (Academic) with no skills band less than 5.5

Ready to apply?

 

Applying to THINK Education is easy. Pick your start date, decide how and where you would like to study, then apply online or give us a call and we’ll do it for you.

Ready to take the next step?

If this course sounds appetising, find out more by enquiring online or start your application by calling us or applying online.

Application Process – A Quick Guide